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Dr. Sukhamoy Barik

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  High Risk Pregnancy Care

If you have a high-risk pregnancy you or your baby might be at increased risk of health problems before, during or after delivery. Typically, special monitoring or care throughout pregnancy is needed. Understand the risk factors for a high-risk pregnancy, and what you can do to take care of yourself and your baby.

  What are the risk factors for a High-risk Pregnancy?
Sometimes a high-risk pregnancy is the result of a medical condition present before pregnancy. In other cases, a medical condition that develops during pregnancy for either you or your baby causes a pregnancy to become high risk.

Specific factors that might contribute to a high-risk pregnancy include:

1) Advanced maternal age. Pregnancy risks are higher for mothers older than age 35.

2) Lifestyle choices. Smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol and using illegal drugs can put a pregnancy at risk.

3) Medical history. A history of chronic hypertension, diabetes, heart disorders, breathing problems such as poorly controlled asthma, infections, and blood-clotting disorders such as deep vein thrombosis can increase pregnancy risks.

4) Surgical history. A history of surgery on your uterus, including multiple C-sections, multiple abdominal surgeries or surgery for uterine tumors (fibroids), can increase pregnancy risks.

5) Pregnancy complications. Various complications that develop during pregnancy can pose risks. Examples include an abnormal placenta position, fetal growth less than the 10th percentile for gestational age (fetal growth restriction) and Rh (rhesus) sensitization — a potentially serious condition that can occur when your blood group is Rh negative and your baby's blood group is Rh positive.

6) Multiple pregnancy. Pregnancy risks are higher for women carrying twins or higher order multiples.



High Risk Pregnancy Care

  What steps can I take to promote a healthy pregnancy?


Whether you know ahead of time that you'll have a high-risk pregnancy or you simply want to do whatever you can to prevent a high-risk pregnancy, stick to the basics. For example:

1) Schedule a preconception appointment. If you're thinking about becoming pregnant, consult your health care provider. He or she might counsel you to start taking a daily prenatal vitamin with folic acid and reach a healthy weight before you become pregnant. If you have a medical condition, your treatment might need to be adjusted to prepare for pregnancy. Your health care provider might also discuss your risk of having a baby with a genetic condition.

2) Seek regular prenatal care. Prenatal visits can help your health care provider monitor your health and your baby's health. Depending on the circumstances, you might be referred to a specialist in maternal-fetal medicine, genetics, pediatrics or other areas.

3) Eat a healthy diet. During pregnancy, you'll need more folic acid, protein, calcium and iron. A daily prenatal vitamin can help fill any gaps. Talk to your health care provider if you have special nutrition needs due to a health condition, such as diabetes.

4) Gain weight wisely. Gaining the right amount of weight can support your baby's health — and make it easier to shed the extra pounds after delivery. Work with your health care provider to determine what's right for you.

5) Avoid risky substances. If you smoke, quit. Alcohol and illegal drugs are off-limits, too. Get your health care provider's OK before you start — or stop — taking any medications or supplements.


  What else do I need to know about High-risk Pregnancy?

Consult your health care provider about how to manage any medical conditions you might have during your pregnancy and how your health might affect labor and delivery. Ask your health care provider to discuss specific signs or symptoms to look out for, such as:

1) Vaginal Bleeding
2) Severe Headaches
3) Pain or cramping in the lower abdomen
4) Watery vaginal discharge — in a gush or a trickle
5) Regular or frequent contractions — a tightening sensation in the abdomen
6) Decreased fetal activity
7) Pain or burning with urination
8) Changes in vision, including blurred vision